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Interview with a Vampire

As an extrovert, and a weirdo, I tend to meet some interesting people. When I meet them, I like to get as much of their perspective as I can on file before our paths diverge. Recently, I met a self-proclaimed vampire who gave me some killer advice on how to overcome procrastination. Below is the convo for your entertainment.

**The vampire is referred to as Raziel to protect his true identity.

Cassandra: I find myself stymied by my own potential. I find I often get overwhelmed with allocating my time because I fear I will allocate it incorrectly, and then will have wasted it. Oddly, though, I don’t do anything with the time and thus guarantee it was wasted.

Raziel: Welcome to the world of true procrastinators. Highly intelligent people tend to have an inherent ego and perfectionism. This manifests itself by subconsciously paralyzing productivity if it feels *slightly* like you don’t know exactly what you’re doing. If you feel like you don’t have all the information required to solve a problem, this paralyzing feeling will become increasingly stronger until the point where you keep thinking about your task but cannot begin it.

The solution to this, given its spiral nature, is to start working towards the problem with the mentality that you have to fail several times in order to finish it. And that there is no fully right way to do it on the first try. That way, your brain won’t be able to trick you into thinking that you’re wasting your time.

Cassandra: Hmm. The assumption of failure is an inevitable, but bitter, pill to swallow. Will I ever fail so badly that I cannot continue?

Raziel: Never. Once you seek it out as a necessary part of your evolution, it will only be a driving force. Just don’t identify yourself with it.

Cassandra: I have come to identify myself with my previous failures. It seems so silly now, but I can clearly see the path that I took to get to this point.

Raziel: It’s not silly at all.

Cassandra: A better word for how I feel might be foolish.

Raziel: Judging necessary steps from the past as being foolish is a waste, and truly foolish. Learn and move on.

Fear of Failure

Raziel is a bit hard on me, but his words ring true. How can one judge the past and pretend it has no bearing on the present?


Photo Credit: nintai – perseverance by Chris Gladis


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Interested in many things, but nothing captivates more than technology, entrepreneurship, futurism, and humanity's quest to problem-solve.

  • Blake

    I can’t articulate a response to this because I’m too busy trying to craft it in such a way that it perfectly reflects my attitude towards the topic.

  • Stephen C. Webster

    The idea that failure is inevitable is unacceptable, particularly in my line of work. We anguish over failure for a reason. But then, we all generate the meaning of the word “failure” for ourselves. Maybe I have a different definition than this fella.